Jan 11, 2016

Review: Forgive Me, Leonard Peacock by Matthew Quick


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Title: Forgive Me, Leonard Peacock
Author: Matthew Quick
Release Date: August 13, 2013
Publisher: Little, Brown Books For Young Readers

Synopsis:

Today is Leonard Peacock's birthday. It is also the day he hides a gun in his backpack. Because today is the day he will kill his former best friend, and then himself, with his grandfather's P-38 pistol.

But first he must say goodbye to the four people who matter most to him: his Humphrey Bogart-obsessed next-door neighbor, Walt; his classmate, Baback, a violin virtuoso; Lauren, the Christian homeschooler he has a crush on; and Herr Silverman, who teachers the high school's class on the Holocaust. Speaking to each in turn, Leonard slowly reveals his secrets as the hours tick by and the moment of truth approaches.

In this riveting look at a day in the life of a disturbed teenage boy, acclaimed author Matthew Quick unflinchingly examines the impossible choices that must be made -- and the light in us all that never goes out.



I am not exactly sure what to feel about this book. Maybe because I read this during one of the most time-constrained and stressful weeks of the school year that it might have affected my opinion on this book... I can't tell. But I am giving this book 3 stars because it was okay.

Forgive Me, Leonard Peacock is a story about a high school student named Leonard, who has a plan built up in his mind. It is birthday, and he plans to kill his old best friend and them himself with his grandfather's P-38 pistol because he feels that he isn't worth enough. But before he does that, he gives out presents to each of the people who mean to him the most before he shoots himself to die. He wants to end it all because, after all, Leonard doesn't mean anything anymore.



This is definitely one of those books that delves deep on how depression can overcome a person's way of thinking. It affected me deeply how -- day by day -- Leonard struggled to keep living, yet no matter how hard he tried to find a good reason why, something was always tugging him back into the void of his own depression.

His mother doesn't care for him.
And it's his 18th birthday after all.
But why didn't people remember that it was his birthday today?

Leonard thinks he's had enough. And it really broke me how he was giving out presents to each of the people he wanted to say goodbye to. The words written about his depression really touched me because I couldn't help but sympathize Leonard for what he was going through. People no longer cared about him, and that made me awful!

One of the things I liked most about this book was that it provided help and advice not just to Leonard, but also to the readers who are reading this book. I like how it balances off despair and hope in its book, and how it features the realities of what depression could do to a person. It also gives a great insight on how depressed people need help.


But somehow, this book didn't exceed my expectations. In fact, almost half of the book didn't connect to me as well, more so the characters themselves. Like I said, it's probably because this week had been awful and stressful for me that I couldn't put my mood to the book. But other than that, I just HATED the writing. 

The writing to me was more of a: "Oh, how interesting, but then'iweofughhhhhhhh."

Let's just say that the writing wasn't my absolute favorite, and I just didn't enjoy it as much as I had expected it to, especially with these annoying and useless footnotes found at the bottom of almost every page. (Yes, there are footnotes in this book!) 

So to conclude, Forgive Me, Leonard Peacock was an okay book to me. Yes I love how it portrayed mental illness in it, but I just hated the writing and the footnotes because it was sort of annoying. (Sorry, Matthew Quick.) :( 3 stars for this one!

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